Get (irregular verb)

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'To get' is an irregular verb. Its forms are given here:

Base form past tense -ed participle Remarks
get got got American English also has gotten as a past participle in some senses, e.g. 'acquire', 'cause', 'come'. So there is a distinction between
"We've gotten tickets" (~ 'have managed to buy'), and
"We've got tickets" (~ 'have in our possession')
This is one of the "the 250 or so irregular verbs" listed in Quirk 1985. The list "contains most of the irregular verbs in present-day English ... but is not meant to be exhaustive, particularly with regard to derivative verbs." AWE has copied most of the entries in that list. The verb 'to get' belongs to Quirk's Class 6 F.
The archaic past participle form gotten, which has disappeared from British Present-day English, survives in two verbs derived from 'to get': 'to forget', which is current, and 'to beget', which survives only in archaic texts. In direct form (as an inflection of 'to get'), it is only normally seen as the cliche formulation "ill-gotten gains", meaning the profits from criminal activity - or at least activity of which the speaker disapproves.
Writers of formal acaemic English should avoid the used of the verb 'get'. It is nearly always possible to find a more precisxe synonym: don't write 'get momentum', but 'ga\in (or acquire) momentum'; it is preferabled 'to become rich' rather than 'to get rich'; and 'to start (or begin)' is better than 'to get going'.