Difference between revisions of "Purgatory"

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According to the teaching of the [[Roman Catholic]] Church '''purgatory''' – the word is pronounced as three [[syllable]]s with the stress on the first, {{IPA|ˈpɜːɡətri}} - is a condition or place in which those who have died in a ‘state of grace’ (i.e., are not guilty of any serious wrongdoing for which they have failed to seek God’s forgiveness) undergo a limited period of suffering. The purpose of this suffering is not punitive but purificatory: it rids those who have died of the harmful effects of their sins and in so doing makes them fit for life in heaven. Thus, in the [[Roman Catholic]] account of life after death, '''purgatory''' is a third state intermediate between, on the one hand, hell, where the irredeemably wicked suffer everlasting punishment for their sins, and, on the other, heaven, where the saintly and those whose sins have been forgiven enjoy eternal bliss. (This tripartite account of the human condition after death provides the structure of [[Dante]]’s epic poem ''La divina commedia'', which tells of the poet’s journey through the afterlife: its three ''cantiche'' (‘books’ or parts) are entitled, respectively, ''Inferno'', ''Purgatorio'', and ''Paradiso'' (i.e., ''Hell'', ''Purgatory'', and ''Heaven'').)
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According to the teaching of the [[Roman Catholic]] Church '''purgatory''' – the word is pronounced as three [[syllable]]s with the stress on the first, and a [[Hard (consonant)|hard 'g']]: 'PUR-ge-tri', {{IPA|ˈpɜːɡətri}} - is a condition or place in which those who have died in a ‘state of grace’ (i.e., are not guilty of any serious wrongdoing for which they have failed to seek God’s forgiveness) undergo a limited period of suffering. The purpose of this suffering is not punitive but purificatory: it rids those who have died of the harmful effects of their sins and in so doing makes them fit for life in heaven. Thus, in the [[Roman Catholic]] account of life after death, '''purgatory''' is a third state intermediate between, on the one hand, hell, where the irredeemably wicked suffer everlasting punishment for their sins, and, on the other, heaven, where the saintly and those whose sins have been forgiven enjoy eternal bliss. (This tripartite account of the human condition after death provides the structure of [[Dante]]’s epic poem ''La divina commedia'', which tells of the poet’s journey through the afterlife: its three ''cantiche'' (‘books’ or parts) are entitled, respectively, ''Inferno'', ''Purgatorio'', and ''Paradiso'' (i.e., ''Hell'', ''Purgatory'', and ''Heaven'').)
  
 
Within [[Christianity]] a belief in '''purgatory''' is distinctive of [[Roman Catholic]]ism, and seems to have arisen in the course of the [[Middle Ages]]. The belief is not to be found in the [[New Testament]], seems not to have been among the beliefs of the earliest [[Christian]]s, and has not been accepted either by the [[Eastern Orthodox Church]] or by any of the various [[Protestant]] denominations.
 
Within [[Christianity]] a belief in '''purgatory''' is distinctive of [[Roman Catholic]]ism, and seems to have arisen in the course of the [[Middle Ages]]. The belief is not to be found in the [[New Testament]], seems not to have been among the beliefs of the earliest [[Christian]]s, and has not been accepted either by the [[Eastern Orthodox Church]] or by any of the various [[Protestant]] denominations.

Latest revision as of 17:16, 8 September 2019

According to the teaching of the Roman Catholic Church purgatory – the word is pronounced as three syllables with the stress on the first, and a hard 'g': 'PUR-ge-tri', IPA: /ˈpɜːɡətri/ - is a condition or place in which those who have died in a ‘state of grace’ (i.e., are not guilty of any serious wrongdoing for which they have failed to seek God’s forgiveness) undergo a limited period of suffering. The purpose of this suffering is not punitive but purificatory: it rids those who have died of the harmful effects of their sins and in so doing makes them fit for life in heaven. Thus, in the Roman Catholic account of life after death, purgatory is a third state intermediate between, on the one hand, hell, where the irredeemably wicked suffer everlasting punishment for their sins, and, on the other, heaven, where the saintly and those whose sins have been forgiven enjoy eternal bliss. (This tripartite account of the human condition after death provides the structure of Dante’s epic poem La divina commedia, which tells of the poet’s journey through the afterlife: its three cantiche (‘books’ or parts) are entitled, respectively, Inferno, Purgatorio, and Paradiso (i.e., Hell, Purgatory, and Heaven).)

Within Christianity a belief in purgatory is distinctive of Roman Catholicism, and seems to have arisen in the course of the Middle Ages. The belief is not to be found in the New Testament, seems not to have been among the beliefs of the earliest Christians, and has not been accepted either by the Eastern Orthodox Church or by any of the various Protestant denominations.

The word 'purgatory' is sometimes used, with no religious associations, to refer to any state of suffering, wretchedness, or unhappiness, especially one that is temporary, as in ‘I hated that school, I was miserable all the time I was there, it was purgatory’.

Etymological note: The word ‘purgatory’ entered English, through Old French, from Latin purgātōrius (‘cleansing’, ‘purifying’), an adjective formed from the verb purgāre, ‘to cleanse’, ‘to purge’, ‘to purify’.

See also Limbo.